This time we are talking to Sona from Azerbaijan. She tells how she had overcome her fear of living abroad, found friends in Germany, and got new dreams.

The visualised podcast “14 square meters” is about students living in the dormitory in Tannenbusch Mitte, not the most attractive area of Bonn. We are knocking at the doors of our neighbours to talk about their past, present, and future, but first of all — about things in their room. Things that make their identical rooms so different.

PHOTOS by Alvaro Peralta

Now on Spotify and Apple Podcasts


Bonn auf der Suche nach einem Mittel gegen Dürre

Bonner bekämpfen die zunehmende Dürre mit bloßen Händen und Gießkannen voller Wasser. Sie kommen und gießen sterbende Bäume in der Innenstadt händisch. Ob es ihnen so gelingt, die Dürreauswirkungen zu stoppen, oder sind ihre Gießkannen nur ein Symbol der Hilflosigkeit angesichts der gigantischen Klimakrise?

Es passiert in Bonn immer öfter: Man geht in den Park Haus Carstanjen — dem ersten Sitz der Vereinten Nationen in der ehemaligen Bundeshauptstadt, — um die Natur zu genießen, und findet Stümpfe da, wo letztes Jahr noch riesige Bäume standen. Ein Resultat von Wassermangel und Dürre…


This time we are talking to Akin from Turkey. He is a journalist and literature lover. Due to his family past, he’s also not a stranger in Germany.

The visualised podcast “14 square meters” is about students living in the dormitory in Tannenbusch Mitte, not the most attractive area of Bonn. We are knocking at the doors of our neighbours to talk about their past, present, and future, but first of all — about things in their room. Things that make their identical rooms so different.

You can now listen to this podcast on ‘Apple Podcasts’: https://podcasts.apple.com/ru/podcast/akin-and-his-library/id1549590763?i=1000505701114

SCROLL DOWN TO NOT MISS THE PHOTOS!


The visualised podcast “14 square meters” is about students living in the dormitory in Tannenbusch Mitte, not the most attractive area of Bonn. We are knocking at the doors of our neighbours to talk about their past, present, and future, but first of all — about things in their room. Things that make their identical rooms so different.

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The episode was removed from Medium by request of the interviewee.

02.02.21


The visualised podcast “14 square meters” is about students living in the dormitory in Tannenbusch Mitte, not the most attractive area of Bonn. We are knocking at the doors of our neighbours to talk about their past, present, and future, but first of all — about things in their room. Things that make their identical rooms so different.

Our first guest is Alvaro. He has spent 31 years in Peru and almost 4 in Germany.

SCROLL DOWN TO NOT MISS THE PHOTOS!

You can now find this podcast on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/ru/podcast/alvaro-and-the-two-palms/id1549590763?i=1000505701116


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Liza is my friend. She lives and works as a sound engineer in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Even in these hard and contagious days, she keeps doing her job at the dubbing studio, where we used to work together. A week ago I tried to skype her. At 11:45 p.m., she was still at work. The next day, finally, we talked.

— What time did you finally go home last night?

— Around 1 a.m., by taxi. The last actor left around 9:45, so there was no sense hurrying to the metro. …


Stories from Russia in times of lockdown

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My father, Yury Dmitriev, lives in Cherepovets, 9th biggest industrial city in Russia. There are 45 registered cases of coronavirus here (data given for 17.04.20). Yury shares his 33 square meters flat with his cat Muslik, found in the street 6 months ago.

His mother, 80 years old, lives 7 minutes walk from him. Since Vladimir Putin introduced holidays because of coronavirus, she hasn’t taken one foot outside. Yury buys her food and leaves it under the door. His mother puts on gloves to carry them in and washes every item with soap. “She also puts out some food for…


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When was the last time you could sit on a bench? Brussels, April 2020

Many of us, like me, are now at home watching the world out of the window. We don’t know what happens next. There are so many scenarios that the head starts spinning.

I imagine the day when everything is over. I see myself going out for coffee. Then taking a plane that will bring me home, to my family. As if everything simply gets back to normal.

But to be honest, I don’t believe things will get back after lockdown. Moreover, our old normal doesn’t seem normal to me.

This pandemic has proven that the world system has a leak.


How empty pocket brought me to the ocean

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There are not so many things in Japan you can afford with only 50 EUR in your pocket. And that’s exactly as much as I had.

When it happens to me in Europe, I know: real adventures are now to come! But in Japan, my travel style is different. As almost no one speaks English, I am trying to establish contacts not only with people but with nature. To do so, I have to move.

I came to Japan with a dream to see the mountains (preferably Fuji) and the ocean. Fuji wasn’t easy to see, but I did it


how many people do you need in the morning?

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In the middle of the night, I woke up from a strange dream where my body had been shaking with no reason. Awake, I was still shaking. So did my boyfriend and the bed under us. “Is it…?” — “An earthquake, yes”.

It’s Tuesday, the day of burnable garbage in Japan. We take one of three plastic bags with trash and leave the house. It’s 8:03 a.m, 5 minutes later than Yann, my boyfriend, usually leaves for work. …

Ana.st.

Active mover• traveller • journalist • editor • English teacher • singer

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